illadore (illadore) wrote,
illadore
illadore

Tornado Pie

What is it with me and apple pie?

Last week, I went to Gulf Wars 2016 and I cooked dinner almost every night for the Aethelmearc encampment. Monday night was Roman, Tuesday night - Dutch 15th Century, Wednesday night - 15th Century Portuguese, and Thursday night, our last night, I attempted to cook German 16th Century, from Marx Rumpolt's Ein new Kochbuch.

Attempted, I say, because we got struck either by a "super cell" or a small tornado that luckily did not touch down. Dinner was to start at 7PM and we got struck at 6:30. I spent the tornado holding on to the Aethelmearc Royal Pavilion tent, in an effort to keep it from flying away. Yes, I know how crazy that is. Somehow, once the 60 mph winds (I have no idea if that was the actual wind speed but that is what I had heard) and the ice cold side-ways bullet like rain stopped, we found that the meat had somehow been fully cooked, the cucumber salad survived, and pies had survived the tornado. I plopped everything down on the tables that were somehow still standing and started my usual spiel: "Tonight's dinner was inspired by Rumpolt..." and got a huge laugh from the whole camp and a fistbump from one of my friends. The pies were devoured.

Holding down a tent during a tornado - 1 out of 5 stars.
Tornado pie - 5 out of 5 stars.

Let's do the numbers:

Tornado pie ala Marx Rumpolt.

For the translation that I used, please see Apple tart from Rumpolt - birth of an A&S entry by Mistress Catrin von Berlin OL (known as Gwen Cat) at Stefan's Florilegium.

Discussion: My version is, at best, perioid, rather than period. Consider it "inspired by" rather than an actual good translation. I was running out of butter so I made a vegetable oil crust with sugar that turned out pretty well and tasty. I also did not sweat the apples in butter, as we were camping and it was an added step. Also, we had golden raisins, not black raisins, as that was what was available at the grocery store. In a way, this was, somewhat in mindset, a medieval pie - as I had to use what ingredients and what time were available to me, as I had no way to run out the market and just get an ingredient I didn't have at the last minute, just like our medieval cooks.

Crust:
2.5 cups of flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup of vegetable oil
enough water - probably 5 to 6 tablespoons

Mix everything all the dry ingredients together and then mix in the liquids until it becomes dough. Work a little bit but not much. Divide in half. Roll out on a pastry mat. Place one in an 9 inch pie pan and hold the other one for the top.

Filling:
6 good sized pie apples. (For the love of the Spaghetti Monster, just say no to Red Delicious)
3/4 cup of sugar
3/4 cup of golden raisins
1 tablespoon of cinnamon

Peel and chop the apples then mix with all the other ingredients. Pour into pie shell. Cover with top and pinch close. Put in the over for 375 for about an hour or so. Pull out when it looks done - or when the tornado is over. (Tornado optional.)
Tags: apple pie, rumpolt, tornado
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  • 8 comments
What would have been used for sugar, back in the day? I believe sugar cane
molasses was often used in the past, here in the US.
Check out these articles -
http://www.sucrose.com/lhist.html
http://www.sugarhistory.net/who-made-sugar/history-of-sugar/

By Rumpolt's time, he'd have been likely using sugar and it appears the recipe mentions it directly.


It seems that they used New World sugar by the 16th century, but earlier, in the 14th century it was an expensive luxury.
This is fantastic
But honestly Monica, at least Judith Griggs isn't around to steal your writing this time. :)
HA.
I thought you might be amused by that.
Happy Birthday!